The importance of tissue culture technique for conservation of endangered Brazilian bromeliads from Atlantic rain forest canopy.

Author(s): 
Mercier, H. and G.B. Kerbauy.
Year: 
1995
Journal: 
Selbyana
Volume: 
16
Issue: 
2
Page Range: 
147–149
Keywords: 
Bromeliaceae, Vriesea fosteriana, Vriesea hieroglyphica, endangered bromeliad, micropropagation
Abstract: 
Seeds were used for establishment of a sterile culture of Vriesea fosteriana and Vriesea hieroglyphica, two endangered ornamental Brazilian bromeliads. Large number of plantlets could be obtained from embryos of Vriesea hieroglyphica when cultivated in Knudson basal medium. In contrast, for Vriesea fosteriana the addition of hormones was required to produce protuberances from which buds were formed. In this process, new leafy shoots can be formed continuously, providing explants to continue the multiplication. Entire leaves removed from aseptically-grown seedlings of Vriesea fosteriana were also used as a source of explants. After twenty days of culture, protuberances were formed at the basal part of them and shoot-buds appeared after one month of culture. For rooting, two different auxins were necessary depending on the species. The rooted shoots were planted in pots and grown in the greenhouse. All plants survived and looked phenotypically normal. This methodology provided a large number of plants, preserving the genetic diversity of the species. This feature is essential for any replacement program that makes use of micropropagated plants.